Tag Archives: node.js

Sense + DevOps = SenseOps

For some time I have been thinking about how to improve the Sense development process as a whole. There is a lot of gathered experience and best practices from the wider software development community, but how can we apply this to Qlik Sense development?

Some initiatives are starting to appear. Qlik themselves are open sourcing microservices such as the Governed Metrics Service , as well as open sourcing key libraries that make it easier to use Sense as a general purpose analytics platform.  I have a couple of contributions in this space too, with the Butler and App duplicator microservices.

I think more can be done though.
Looking at the concepts promoted in DevOps, it struck me that Sense development follows about the same phases as those in DevOps. Combining Sense and DevOps of course gives us….

 

SenseOps

 

The more I looked at it, the more I felt “wow – SenseOps really rocks!”

Thus, please meet a new site: senseops.rocks

Head over for a look, and feel free to feedback in the discussion forums there.
Enjoy!

 

Qlik Sense app duplicator 1.2: User interface included


For a long time I wanted to learn more about client side development.

Javascipt, CSS, reactive frameworks etc – all those concepts that make today’s web sites tick. I really think backend developers can benefit from having at least a basic understanding of how the front-end works – this will make the finished app better as a whole.

Couple this with a desire to learn Vue.js specifically, and we get a user interface for the Qlik Sense app duplicator service.

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App duplicator service for Qlik Sense

 

I worked on a small node.js server during the past couple of weeks. The idea came from the fact that

  1. I over and over again find myself creating Sense apps that are almost identical, and
  2. people starting out as Sense developers spend too much time learning the basics. I wanted to bootstrap their learning process by providing well written skeleton apps for them.

This could of course be achieved by just duplicating apps using the QMC, but it would be way better if there was a nice little web app that listed the available Sense app templates, and allowed anyone (with permissions to create apps) to create new apps based on them. Or maybe this feature could even be integrated into one of the different Sense hubs that are now available…

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Butler for Qlik Sense version 2.0

Butler 2.0 is out!

Champagne

A summer project is over, and Butler  has been released in a version that is a total rewrite of Butler version 1.x. Butler 2.0 includes features such as

  • Real-time monitoring of what users are active on a Sense Enterprise system
  • Real-time monitoring of failed reload tasks, with notifications sent as emails, to Slack channels and as MQTT messages
  • Starting Sense reload tasks from the load script or from external systems, using a REST API
  • Posting messages to Slack from the reload script. Great for sysadmin notifications as well as notifying end users that new data is available in an app
  • Sending MQTT pub-sub messages from the load script
  • Get full metadata, including load script, for any app
  • Getting free disk info for the Sense server
  • …and more

All in all, Butler 2.0 includes a set of features that offers greatly enhanced features for anyone involved in the operation of a Sense Enterprise environment.

Butler is available via Qlik Branch, with all source code hosted on GitHub.
Documentation is available on github.io. That documentation is the best starting point for learning more about what Butler does and how to use it.

Some sample screen shots shows what is possible to achieve:

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Listing all Telldus Live devices in Node-RED

Tellstick Net and DuoContinuing from the previous post about publishing data from Telldus Live to MQTT, here is small piece of related Node-RED code. It outputs a list of all (wirelessly controlled) 220V/mains switches I have linked to Telldus Live, using a Tellstick Net.

The background of the code was simply that I wanted a convenient way of getting a complete list of all devices (switches, dimmers, door bells, …) known to my Telldus Live account. When testing different devices, moving them around, renaming them etc, it is very easy to loose track of which device does what, and what their respective IDs are. This little function solves that quite nicely.

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Using Node-RED for publishing Telldus Live data to MQTT

Tellstick Net and DuoTelldus has a set of nice little gadgets (“Tellstick”, for short) that both allow you to control remote switches over radio (433.92 MHz), and to read sensors transmitting on that same frequency. Telldus also has a backend service, Telldus Live, which offer Tellstick users scheduling features (turning lamps on/off at certain times, or when certain conditions occur), as well as showing the latest sensor readings.

The above is at least true if you have a Tellstick Net, which connects to your home network and sends device and sensor data to the Telldus Live service. You can also achieve the same thing with the non-connected Tellstick models, and an always-on computer running Telldus’ software.

Anyway – let’s assume that Telldus Live can see your switches, sensors and other connected devices. Would it not be cool if you could bring all that data into Node-RED, and from there create whatever feature you dreamt of.

How about sending an SMS when the  garage door is still open, but your presence data indicate that you have left for work? Easy.

Or the opposite: Send a tweet to your Node-RED server, which will then fire off an event to Telldus Live, turning a switch on, and by doing so closing the garage door? No problem.

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Start Node-RED on OS X login

Node-RED flow for controlling a Blink(1) USB indicator light

Node-RED flow for controlling a Blink(1) USB indicator light

Node-RED is a truly awesome framework for visually building data flows. There is a lot of focus on wiring together hardware devices and Internet of Things, but there are also plenty of modules for connecting to email, social media, various online services etc.

After using it during some months I can confirm that stability is absolutely fine, don’t think I have had a single issue with the setup due to Node-RED itself.

Version 0.10.1 came out a week or so ago (early Feb 2015) and brought things like better partitioning of flows in the form of subflows, improved Raspberry Pi support, binary MQTT payloads to name just a few of the improvements.

I am running Node-RED on an always-on Mac, running latest OS X. This machine is very stable but for various reasons I do need to restart it every now and then. It would then be very nice to have Node-RED start automatically at boot. That’s somewhat complex to do, but having an app starting at login is trivial – let’s do that instead. I am always logged into this computer anyway, so it won’t be a problem.

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