Butler SOS 5.4 is out: good looks and app details

Butler SOS provides real-time insights into Qlik Sense Enterprise on Windows environments.

Time for another update of Butler SOS, this time to version 5.4.

Github release : https://github.com/ptarmiganlabs/butler-sos/releases
Docker image   : https://hub.docker.com/r/ptarmiganlabs/butler-sos
Documentation  : butler-sos.ptarmiganlabs.com

This release both adds some nice new features as well as enhancing existing ones and fixing some bugs. Let’s take a look at the highlights.

  • Track in detail what apps are loaded into each Sense server.
  • Regular apps and session apps are handled separately, making app metrics easier to understand and more relevant
  • Sample dashboards are now built using the brand new, shiny and all together awesome Grafana 7. Did I mention that Grafana 7 is awesome? Awesome.
  • Ever wondered how long Butler SOS has been running or how much memory it uses? The new uptime messages have you covered.
  • You are properly impressed with the uptime messages – good. Why not store them to Influxdb, so you can also visualize Butler SOS’ own memory use? It’s just a couple of changes in the config file away.
  • Better control over what features are enabled. Don’t need Docker health checks? Now you can turn that (and other) feature off.
  • Ah, you are a serious Sense user and have separate DEV and PROD environments? Good – now Butler SOS supports multiple instances running on a single server.
  • Who will monitor the monitor? Butler SOS can now send heartbeats to customisable URLs at desired intervals. Perfect if you want to monitor Butler SOS using for example healthchecks.io. Very, very cool actually.
  • Bugs, bugs and bugs. The known ones have been fixed. Keep reporting new ones!
  • Update all dependencies to latest versions, to ensure security concerns are adressed.

Curious what it looks like in practice?
Seeing is believing:

Oh data where art thou?

When implementing Qlik Sense solutions for enterprise clients they usually have various requirements regarding alerts for failed reloads, support SLAs etc.
Those are all interesting challenges to implement, but the most common request is probably:

“The system should alert me if data doesn’t arrive on time”

It’s a reasonable request. If some source system is delayed and doesn’t delivery data to Sense on time, they as a system or application owner should be notified.

Don’t bother me unless it’s broken

The second thing almost all clients say is:

“Oh, I only want alerts when data is delayed. No messages when data is on time.”

Again, this is very reasonable.

Let’s say the extract app in Sense sends a notification email once data has been loaded from the source system. Great – we now know that data has arrived, and when it did.
Except that we will drown in such notifications from all our dozens (or hundreds..) of extract apps.

It’s kind of hard to implement this in a good way though, at least I have never found a really good, generic solution for this request.
Sure, you can have a Sense app who’s only job is to execute every 15 minutes and check whether data has arrived, and alert if data is delayed. That app will however put load on your Sense environment and use one of the reload slots. Even if the app reloads quickly it’s still pretty bad system design, IMHO.

I have a suggestion for a better option:

Set up a monitoring tool that views the Sense app (or rather its load script) as a black box with unknown function. The only thing the monitoring tool cares about is whether that black box has checked in within some configured interval.

I stumbled upon this while looking at ways to monitor servers in general, but quickly realised it could be used also with Sense.
By the way: while I have only used the described concept on Qlik Sense, it should work equally well with QlikView.

Don’t care for reading? This video outlines the concept, otherwise keep reading below.

Continue reading “Oh data where art thou?”

Butler SOS 5.0 is out – new features, new doc site

Butler SOS has matured quite a bit during past couple of years, with latest additions being fine-grained monitoring of what users are connected to what servers.
Opens up for various interesting use cases, including notification to users before server restarts etc.

A brand new doc site (butler-sos.ptarmiganlabs.com) also goes live today (built with Hugo and Docsy, vastly better than the previous one-pager at GitHub.

Starting today that site is the goto-place for everything Butler SOS related.
The site contains both installation and configuration instructions, as well as a (hopefully growing) set of examples on how Butler SOS can be used in various way.

Make sure to check out the blog section of that site too!

If you don’t measure it, you can’t improve it: DevOps concepts meets Qlik Sense

Real-time monitoring of user sessions using Butler SOS

Butler SOS 4.0 is out, adding features that make it easier than ever to monitor large Qlik Sense environments. We’ll return to this topic of course, but let’s first take a few steps back.

There are many variants of that quote: “If you can’t measure it, you can’t improve it”, “Measure what matters”, “Measure what is measurable, and make measurable what is not so.” and others. The last one supposedly originates with Galileo Galilei. Smart guy.

The development of Butler SOS continues in that spirit. Qlik Sense provides an awesome platform on top of which all kinds of data analysis, visualisation and presentation solutions can be built. A key word there is platform. Sense does not offer solutions to all software development challenges, nor should it. Instead, use the tools and best practices that millions of developers around the world have refined over the years.

Qlik Sense does on the other hand offer a very comprehensive set of APIs that give developers access to its internals – and this is part of why it’s such a powerful platform. Butler SOS taps into some of these APIs, exposing their data in the form of real-time dashboards, charts and alerts. Suddenly sysadmins know can get both an overview of how all servers are doing, as well as look at detailed server metrics when so needed.
All made possible using the Sense APIs, but in general powered by various open source tools.

We’re basically back to Galileo – let’s make sure the important parts of Qlik Sense are measurable. It is then possible to improve the parts that don’t work well.

Continue reading “If you don’t measure it, you can’t improve it: DevOps concepts meets Qlik Sense”

One click creation of Qlik Sense apps: Butler App Duplicator 3.0 is out

Photo by Brent Olson on Unsplash .

Heading for the mountains here, but a quick update first.

Everyone’s favourite app wizard for Qlik Sense (ok… my favourite wiz at least..) has had a major face lift – yay!

The basics are the same, i.e. one-click creation of Qlik Sense apps, using regular Sense apps as templates. Several new features however take the tool to a new level, making it easier to set up, manage and more enterprise grade. Good news thus!

Continue reading “One click creation of Qlik Sense apps: Butler App Duplicator 3.0 is out”

Butler Spyglass: Data lineage and metadata tool for Qlik Sense

Latest member of the Butler family

For years I have thought about ways to get data lineage info for all apps in a Qlik Sense Enterprise environment.

It would be super useful to know exactly what apps use a particular data source, as well as vice versa (what data sources are used by a specific app). I know there are commercial tools doing this and much more, but I wanted something easy to use, yet still effective and free.

Same thing for app load scripts: Extracting and storing them to disk in human readable format has more than once save days of work, when something has gone badly wrong in an app.
Dumping load scripts to disk was possible in my original Butler tool, but then only one app at a time. So not quite what was needed in an enterprise context.

Enter Butler Spyglass

Continue reading “Butler Spyglass: Data lineage and metadata tool for Qlik Sense”

Monitoring for Qlik Sense: Butler SOS v3 is out

The latest version fo Butler SOS is out, taking the version number to 3.0.
A lot of the code has been fine tuned to better meet the needs of enterprise grade Qlik Sense deployments.

Docker (or some compatible container platform) is now the preferred and recommended way of running Butler SOS. Butler SOS has been developed and tested on Linux and Mac OS, but should in theory run also other Docker enabled platforms.

New features

Version 3 adds a few – but useful – features:

  • Per-server config option “serverGroup”. Use this to group or categorize servers, for example as being part of a production vs development Qlik Sense cluster. This enables the creation of Grafana dashboards that use Grafana variables to automatically show metrics for all PRODUCTION servers. This greatly simplifies using Butler SOS in large Qlik Sense environments, where servers are frequently added/removed. No need to manually update the Grafana dashboards any more.
  • Config option “queryPeriod” for controlling how far back querying for Sense log entries should be done. Used together with the logdb.pollingInterval setting, it is now possible to fine tune how often the Qlik Sense log database is queried for errors and warnings.
Continue reading “Monitoring for Qlik Sense: Butler SOS v3 is out”

The beauty of Docker – how to run all Butler tools with a single command

Docker is great.

Docker is one of those tools that have the potential to fundamentally transform how you develop and run software – once you have tried Docker it is hard to imagine going back to something else.

In previous posts we have seen how Butler, Butler SOS and Butler CW can be run as Docker containers.
But we can do even better – why not control all the Butler tools from a single docker-compose file? Maybe even specifying the dependencies on influxdb and mqtt in there too?

Setting this up is incredibly easy – a single docker-compose file tells Docker what containers to use, and some config files tells the Butler tools where to find things.

Let’s get started!

Continue reading “The beauty of Docker – how to run all Butler tools with a single command”

Docker everywhere – Qlik Sense operations monitor using Butler SOS

Following up on previous posts (here and here) about the Butler family of tools being Dockerized, here is another one on the same topic:

Butler SOS can now be run in a Docker container. 

This is good news as it makes it a lot easier to set up real-time monitoring of a Qlik Sense enterprise environment, compared to the previous (still working, btw) method of installing Node.js and then running Butler SOS on top of Node.

The Github repository has all the details – head over there to get the latest release of the code as well as instructions how to run Butler SOS using Docker.

The Docker image is available on Docker Hub, if you want to get started right away.

 

Butler Cache Warmer + Docker = True

More Docker in the Butler family!

Today version 2.0 of Butler CW was released, including a Docker image and configuration files needed to run Butler CW as a Docker container.

Feature wise the stand-alone Node.js app and the new container-based solution are identical, it’s just way more convenient to run it as a Docker container.

Additional info is available in the GitHub repository.

Yesterday the original Butler tool was Dockerized, today Butler CW… Do you see the trend?

Continue reading “Butler Cache Warmer + Docker = True”